"Miracle on the Hudson" co-pilot speaks to Mayo Clinic workers - KTTC Rochester, Austin, Mason City News, Weather and Sports

"Miracle on the Hudson" co-pilot speaks to Mayo Clinic workers

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Pilot Jeff Skiles addresses Mayo Clinic workers about the importance of teamwork. Pilot Jeff Skiles addresses Mayo Clinic workers about the importance of teamwork.
Skiles in front of an image taken moments after U.S. Airways Flight 1549 landed in the Hudson River. Skiles in front of an image taken moments after U.S. Airways Flight 1549 landed in the Hudson River.
ROCHESTER, Minn. (KTTC) -

"The Miracle on the Hudson" made national headlines when two pilots safely landed a US Airways Flight 1549 on the Hudson River in January 2009.

Captain Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger and his co-pilot, Jeff Skiles, were able to save everyone on board.

Captain "Sully" flew three more times before retiring, while Skiles continues flying around the world.

Besides flying, Skiles also travels around the country talking to different groups. On Friday, he spoke to hospital workers at Mayo Clinic about the importance of teamwork. 

He shared his story from that January 2009 flight to Mayo staff members. He said the airline industry has been successful in creating safety management systems, which have made flying safer. Sharing the success of those systems to people across the nation is a responsibility he's happy to take on. 

"Hospitals can adopt a lot of our procedures that we've used very well. It's a different industry, but if you look at the overall concepts they're valid to airlines, hospitals, even the business community," said Skiles.

Skiles said 2001 was the last time a major U.S. airline had a fatality. From 2001 onward, accidents only happened on regional flights. But in 2009, regional carriers changed their safety systems. Since then, there hasn't been a fatality on a regional carrier.

A handful of Mayo One pilots attended Skiles speech including Brian Fiek. He shared what went through his mind as Skiles's shared his story.

"It's one of those things you put in your mind every time you take off: today could be the day. You have to be prepared for that everyday you go into work that today might be the day that something like that happens. You have to be prepared for it and fall back on your training like he said."

Skiles said he was well-trained and prepared for what happened that January day eight years ago.

He wants others to be able to handle extreme crisis situations, and for companies to support their employees to be the best they can be so that the organization can be successful. 

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