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What it takes to get a Good Night's Sleep Video included

The Centers for Disease Control report more than a third of Americans don't get enough sleep. Aside from being tired, not getting enough sleep can have pretty damaging effects.

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Healing the Hurt: Some patients turn to acupuncture for relief from grief Video included

Acupuncturist Sara Bublitz demonstrates acupuncture treatment Acupuncturist Sara Bublitz demonstrates acupuncture treatment

Grief is something that impacts everyone. It can be crippling and make day-to-day tasks seem impossible. Some are turning to acupuncture to heal the hurt from grief.    

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Avoiding a fall: How to prevent one of the leading cause of injuries among older adults

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, every year, millions of people ages 65 and older fall. What's more, is that just one fall more than doubles a person's chance of falling again.

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Apartment dwellers more likely to smoke

Apartment residents are more likely to smoke and less likely to have smoke-free rules than people living in single-family homes, U.S. health officials report.

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Allergies less common in kids who suck thumb, bite nails

If your kid's nail-biting or thumb-sucking habit drives you nuts, you'll be happy to hear that a new study suggests those habits may have a health benefit.

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U.S. teens less sweet on soft drinks

American teens are turning their backs on soft drinks, says a new government survey that shows soda consumption among youth declined by almost a third in just two years.

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Painkiller that killed Prince part of dangerous wave of new synthetic drugs

The recent overdose death of rock legend Prince has brought renewed focus on the dangers posed by synthetic opioids -- laboratory-created narcotics tweaked by chemists to produce potentially lethal highs while skirting U.S. drug laws.

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1 in 13 young adults in U.S. considered suicide in past year

About one in 13 young adults in the United States had serious thoughts of suicide in 2013-2014, federal officials reported Thursday.

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Just 6 percent of chest pain cases in ER are life-threatening

Americans who develop chest pain often rush to the hospital, where they're treated with urgency. A new study suggests, however, that less than 6 percent of these patients suffer from life-threatening conditions such as a heart attack.

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6 ways women can take care of their tickers

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among American women, but there are a number of preventive measures women can take, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

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Are 'workaholics' prone to OCD, anxiety?

Some workaholics may be prone to mental health disorders, compared to folks with greater work-life balance, new research suggests.

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Asthma symptoms can bloom in springtime

Asthma symptoms increase in spring, making it especially important for people with the lung disease to be aware of triggers and risk factors, an expert says.

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5 warning signs of stroke

Knowing five sudden and severe warning signs of stroke can help save lives and reduce the number of people living with disabilities, a stroke expert says.

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Day care babies catch stomach bugs earlier, but get fewer later

Babies in day care catch their first stomach bug earlier than home-based infants, but end up getting fewer of these gastrointestinal illnesses during their preschool years, new research suggests.

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Bed bugs drawn to red and black colors

Bed bugs have favorite colors, new research has discovered.

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Lonely, isolated people may be prone to heart disease, stroke

Lonely and isolated people may face a higher risk of heart disease and stroke, researchers report.

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Marriage may be a cancer fighter

A wedding band may be powerful medicine against cancer, a new study suggests.

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Cost of insulin rises threefold in just a decade

Americans with diabetes who rely on insulin to keep their blood sugar levels in check are facing sticker shock: A new study finds the price of insulin has tripled in only 10 years.

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Biking or walking to work helps keep you fit

Walking, cycling or taking public transit to work helps middle-aged adults lose body fat and weight, new research suggests.

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An expert's guide to sneezin' season

This could be a bad spring allergy season and people with allergies need to be prepared, an expert warns.

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Vaccine refusal a driving force behind measles outbreaks

A look at recent measles outbreaks in the United States finds more than half of the cases involved unvaccinated children.

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Could too much cellphone time signal anxiety, depression?

Some young adults who constantly reach for their smartphones might be anxious or depressed, preliminary research suggests.

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Smoothing the transition to Daylight Saving Time

Be prepared to lose a bit of sleep this weekend with the switch to Daylight Saving Time, but one doctor offers some tips for a smooth transition.

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Doctor's empathy boosts patient satisfaction

Patients do better and are more satisfied with their care if they believe their doctor is empathetic, a new study suggests.

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Half of Americans' calories come from 'ultra-processed' foods

More than half of the average American diet is composed of so-called ultra-processed foods, a new study finds.

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Head lice no cause for panic

Most parents have at one time or another received the dreaded school notice: a case of head lice has been detected in your child's class.

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Women in cardiac arrest may be less likely to receive help

Women are less likely than men to be helped by bystanders if they suffer cardiac arrest, a new study finds.

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Exercise + classwork may = better math scores

Schoolchildren may have an easier time learning if exercise is part of their math and spelling lessons, a new study suggests.

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Nerve block technique might help ease chronic back pain

A procedure that uses radio waves to treat chronic low back pain provided long-lasting relief to a small group of patients, researchers report.

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Vaccine has cut HPV infection rate in teen girls by two-thirds

Ten years of vaccinating against human papillomavirus (HPV) has cut infections from this cancer-causing virus by 64 percent among teen girls, U.S. health officials report.

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Valentine's Day can still be sweet for loved ones with diabetes

If your sweetheart has diabetes or prediabetes, get creative and celebrate Valentine's Day without chocolates or a fancy restaurant meal, an expert says.

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Another STD spurs concern

There's yet another sexually transmitted infection that doctors and patients need to watch out for -- Mycoplasma genitalium.

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Lasting damage seen in LGBT teens who suffer harassment

Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) teens who experience severe harassment can suffer from serious mental health problems, a new study suggests.

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Frequent monitoring may keep alcohol offenders sober

A South Dakota program that requires people involved in alcohol-linked crimes to stay away from booze and be closely monitored for drinking appears to reduce deaths, a new study finds.

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National smoking bans help everyone, especially nonsmokers

National smoking bans appear to be reducing the health harms caused by secondhand smoke, especially heart disease.

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Super Bowl foods can be a win, win -- healthy and delicious

Super Bowl Sunday is as much about eating as it is about whether the Panthers or the Broncos score the first touchdown.

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Too much social media could mess up your sleep

Young adults who spend too much time on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram may pay the price in poor sleep, new research suggests.

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As winter storm targets eastern U.S., tips for stepping out safely

With much of the eastern United States bracing for a major winter storm this weekend, one expert is offering advice on how to lower your risk of slipping or falling on ice or snow once you head outside.

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Average U.S. home harbors about 100 types of insects, other critters

Even if you think you live alone, you may not: A new study finds that the average American shares his or her home with over 100 different species of insects and other "arthropods."

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Slow heart rate doesn't mean early death risk

People with a slow heart rate don't have an increased risk for heart disease, a new study suggests.

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Doctors choose less aggressive care at end of life

Doctors facing death are less likely to demand aggressive care that might squeeze out a bit more extra time of life, two new studies show.

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New rules for mammograms, tanning beds top health news of 2015

While no one health story dominated in 2015, the year did mark some milestones and important trends, with news in cancer screening and prevention topping the list.

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Isabel Perez gets bucket list wish granted by three high school seniors taking her to prom

Isabel and her three friends get ready for prom Isabel and her three friends get ready for prom

One 7-year-old prom princess is seeing her dream come true next weekend. Being the Belle of the Ball is at the top of Isabel Perez's bucket list, as she battles a life-threatening disease. More>>

Is the 'no-shampoo' trend a healthy one?

A new trend in beauty is based on the idea that less is more -- at least when it comes to shampooing your hair.

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Americans growing more concerned about head injuries in football

As the National Football League continues to struggle with the health risks posed by concussions, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll finds that vast majorities of Americans say football teams need to do more to protect their...

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Sleep, Naps and Diabetes Risk

Sleep, Naps and Diabetes Risk Type 2 diabetes risk linked to daytime sleepiness, long naps If a siesta is part of your everyday routine, there may be cause for concern. More>>

The Role of Sugary Drinks in Diabetes Risk

The Role of Sugary Drinks in Diabetes Risk Type 2 diabetes risk linked to sugar-sweetened beverage intake as part of poor diet Sugary drinks have recently been linked to type 2 diabetes risk, but new... More>>

Are you a secret santa or a grinch? Brain scans may tell

Whether you spend the Christmas season decking the halls and whistling Christmas tunes, or grumbling "bah humbug" at holiday-spirited passers-by may depend largely on a particular network of nerves in your brain, a small...

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